Teenagers

Many teenagers think that the moment they leave the consultation room their doctor will be on the phone to their parents. But this isn’t the case.

Consultations between a doctor and patient are confidential. The bottom line is, if you don’t want your parents or anyone else to be involved, they don’t have to be.

What’s discussed during a consultation should go no further, unless you give permission for your doctor to inform someone else. That means the receptionist or practice nurses are also not allowed to divulge that you’ve been at the practice.

Occasionally, your doctor may encourage you to talk to your parents about your problem or ask for permission to contact them. This is because they feel it will help you. They may feel you don’t fully understand the treatment you need, or believe that adult help is necessary.

If you definitely don’t want your parents involved, you may be encouraged to talk to a grandparent, aunt or uncle, or older brother or sister.

On very rare occasions (if it’s felt to be in the best interest of the patient’s health and safety) a doctor will breach confidentiality. However, this only happens in exceptional circumstances – for example, if a person with epilepsy is having fits and yet continues to drive.

Contraception

Our doctors and nurses are able to offer confidential contraceptive advice.

See below for more information on different types of contraception.

Chlamydia Screening

Chlamydia is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection among under-25s. Often there are no symptoms, but testing and treatment are simple.

Causes and risk factors Chlamydia is usually passed from one person to another during vaginal, oral or anal sex, or by sharing sex toys. It can live inside cells of the cervix, urethra, rectum and sometimes in the throat and eyes.

Useful Links

National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP)


Teenage Health Useful Sites


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice